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Lactulose (Control)

 

What is Lactulose?
Lactulose is a synthetic sugar unable to be absorbed by the body. The unabsorbed Lactulose will continue through the digestive tract and arrive into the large bowel in every human. There, the lactulose will be fermented by bacteria and gas will be produced (hydrogen and/or methane).

 

How is the Lactulose Test used?

The Lactulose Test is compulsory as it is used to provide a baseline for each patient. The Lactulose test aids in the interpretation of results in many ways. Firstly, it gives an indication of a patient’s oro-caecal transit time. The test also assesses a patient’s level of hydrogen and methane production in order to cross-reference with subsequent sugar tests. Finally the Lactulose Test can be an indicator for the necessity of the SIBO test.

Fructose

 

What is Fructose?
Fructose is a single molecule sugar (monosaccharide) that many people cannot effectively absorb. Fructose is present in many foods, including high fructose corn syrup, which is increasingly being used as a food additive. It is also found in many naturally occurring foods including but not limited to: Apples, Watermelon, Pears, Honey and Onion.

 

What is Fructose malabsorption?
Fructose Malabsorption is the result of the body’s inability to fully absorb dietary fructose. If you do not fully absorb Fructose in the food and drink you consume, fructose will arrive at the large intestine and will be metabolised by the bacteria present there. This fermentation process can contribute to the IBS-type symptoms that many experience. It is estimated that approximately 35% of people malabsorb fructose.

 

Can Fructose malabsorption be treated?
Yes! Correct diagnosis of the problem, followed by specialist guidance on diet and lifestyle changes often result in reduction and sometimes elimination of symptoms. Once fructose malabsorption has been identified referral to an experienced Accredited Practising Dietician is recommended to receive further guidance.

Lactose

 

What is Lactose?
Lactose is a double molecule sugar (disaccharide) which is found in milk and milk based products. While Lactose is found in soft unripened cheeses, it is not found in hard, block cheeses.

 

What is Lactose Intolerance?
Lactose is broken down in the body by the lactase enzyme. If your body produces low or minimal amounts of Lactase,  the lactose you consume may not be fully absorbed causing fermentation by the bacteria present in the large intestine. This condition is called Lactose Intolerance, and can result in a range of IBS-type symptoms. The prevalence of Lactose Intolerance varies across populations, with Asians having a high likelihood of having Lactose Malabsorption, while Caucasians have a lower incidence. It is generally accepted that your risk of developing Lactose Intolerance increases with age.

 

Can Lactose Intolerance be treated?
Yes! Correct diagnosis of the problem, followed by specialist guidance on diet and lifestyle changes often result in reduction and sometimes elimination of symptoms. Once lactose intolerance has been identified referral to an experienced Accredited Practising Dietician is recommended to receive further guidance.

Sorbitol

 

What is Sorbitol?
Sorbitol is a Polyol commonly found in some fruits and vegetables (Apples, Blackberries, Watermelon, Plums, Peaches, Cauliflower, Mushrooms etc). It is increasingly used in “sugar free” products as an artificial sweetener, and also contained in many breath mints and chewing gums.

 

What is Sorbitol Malabsorption?
Sorbitol Malabsorption is the result of the body’s inability to fully absorb dietary Sorbitol. If you do not fully absorb Sorbitol in the food and drink you consume, the Sorbitol will arrive at the large intestine and will be metabolised by the bacteria present there. This fermentation process can contribute to the IBS-type symptoms that many experience. It is estimated that approximately 50% of people malabsorb Sorbitol.

 

Can Sorbitol malabsorption be treated?
Yes! Correct diagnosis of the problem, followed by specialist guidance on diet and lifestyle changes often result in reduction and sometimes elimination of symptoms. Once Sorbitol intolerance has been identified referral to an experienced Accredited Practising Dietician is recommended to receive further guidance.

Glucose (SIBO)

 

What is Glucose?
Glucose is a monosaccharide often found in plants. It is used to determine evidence of SIBO as it is expected that everyone should be able to fully absorb glucose in the early stages of the small intestine.

 

What is SIBO?
SIBO stands for Small Intestine Bacterial Overgrowth. It is a disorder of excessive bacterial growth of the small intestine. The bacteria of a normal person should be mainly concentrated in the large intestine. Over time some of the bacteria population can migrate into the small intestine, where they will ferment sugars in foods consumed by the person. This process leads to IBS-type symptoms. The small intestine has more sensitive pain receptors than the large intestine, as it is not normally the site of gas production and distention, hence symptoms can be severe. SIBO can be caused by many things, including the result of pre-existing malabsorptions of one or more FODMAP sugars leading to increased levels of bacteria in the large bowel.

 

Can SIBO be treated?
Yes! Upon correct diagnosis of the disorder a specialist can guide the patient into proper treatment plans. SIBO is often treated through taking probiotics or antibiotics, dietary changes, or any combination of these. Seeking the advice of a General Practitioner and/or Accredited Practising Dietician is recommended for further guidance.

Sucrose

 

What is Sucrose?
Sucrose, like Lactose, is a double molecule sugar (disaccharide) commonly known as table sugar.

 

What is Sucrose Intolerance?
Sucrose (commonly known as table sugar) is broken down in the body by the Sucrase enzyme. If your body produces low or minimal amounts of Sucrase, the sucrose you consume may not be fully absorbed causing fermentation by the bacteria present in the large intestine. This condition is called Sucrose Intolerance, and can result in a range of IBS-type symptoms. The condition is quite rare only affecting approximately roughly 1 in 1000 IBS patients.

 

Can Sucrose Intolerance be treated?
Yes! Correct diagnosis of the problem, followed by specialist guidance on diet and lifestyle changes often result in reduction and sometimes elimination of symptoms. Once sucrose intolerance has been identified referral to an experienced Accredited Practising Dietician is recommended to receive further guidance.

Mannitol

 

What is Mannitol?
Mannitol is a Polyol commonly found in some fruits and vegetables such as mushrooms, cauliflower and watermelon. Like sorbitol, it is also contained in chewing gums, breath mints, and sugar free lollies.

 

What is Mannitol malabsorption?
Mannitol Malabsorption is the result of the body’s inability to fully absorb dietary Mannitol. If you do not fully absorb Mannitol in the food and drink you consume, the Mannitol will arrive at the large intestine and will be metabolised by the bacteria present there. This fermentation process can contribute to the IBS-type symptoms that many experience.

 

Can Mannitol Malabsorption be treated?
Yes! Correct diagnosis of the problem, followed by specialist guidance on diet and lifestyle changes often result in reduction and sometimes elimination of symptoms. Once mannitol intolerance has been identified, referral to an experienced Accredited Practising Dietician is recommended to receive further guidance.